Andrew Maynard

Victoria / Australia

30
Andrew Maynard 30
Andrew Maynard
Andrew is Tasmanian and has a bachelor of Environmental Design and a bachelor of Architecture (with honours), both of which he received at the University of Tasmania. He was invited to undertake a PhD at RMIT university, which he started, however someone at RMIT said something mean to him once so he threw a tantrum and left.
Andrew has won loads of awards. While still at uni he won an international design competition that sent him around the world. A short time later he won the Asian Pacific Design Awards for his Design Pod. Again the prize was a trip around the world, plus other cool stuff. His prefab housing model has received awards and his built work have gone on to win loads of local and international accolades. Last year HOUSE House received a high commendation in the house of the year category at the World Architecture Festival (WAF) in Singapore. HUGE! Ilma, Hill House and Moor house have also been shortlisted at WAF in the past. Hill House, Anglesea and HOUSE House have all won at the AIA annual awards. His Zero Waste Table received recognition at the United Nations World Environment Day Awards. Awards, Awards, Awards. But you know what they say, awards are like haemorrhoids, sooner or later every arsehole gets one.
Andrew’s work has been exhibited throughout the world, which is nice. His first big exhibition was at the YOUNG Guns exhibition in New York City in 2004. At the moment his Styx Valley Protest Shelter is being exhibited at the Venice Architecture Biennale. Venice!

Andrew is regularly asked to lecture, which he loves. A couple of years ago he was a keynote speaker at the Malaysian Institute of Architects conference where he gave a lecture to over 2000 delegates. Next year he’ll be a keynote speaker at the New Zealand Institute of Architects conference. What a show off. Last week he was a speaker at a conference that was all about time. Andrew was asked to speak about the way that old buildings influence, and often confine, the way that we see the city in the present. Other speakers were scientists, academics and philosophers. He wasn’t out of his depth, much.
Andrew has an ongoing love affair with all types of media. He is interested in the way that the ubiquitous nature of media influences culture. TV, newspapers, magazines, books, and various types of new media have been very kind to Andrew. There are loads of good interviews with him here. He’s even been asked to host TV series, which is rather rad. He declined an audition to host Grand Designs Australia (which he kinda regrets). He did an audition to host a show called THE RENOVATORS. The show turned out to be a flop, so he dodged a bullet with that one. He’s currently being pursued to host a new show, but thats a bit hush hush, so pretend that I didn’t mention it.
Andrew is left of centre and can’t keep his political views to himself. He’s keen to see a fair, equitable and generous world. He thinks that there should be an even distribution of wealth and that white middle class people like him should consider their responsibilities more than their rights. After all, the world has been designed in favour of people like him for too long. Andrew’s hero is Peter Singer, the bioethicist, and he attempts to follows Singer’s lead by giving away a healthy chunk of his income to people that could use it more than him. Andrew also tries not to eat meat, because it’s ruthlessly unsustainable, but dead animals are really tasty so he has a lot of trouble with vegetarianism. He’s rather concerned that subsequent generations are going to look back at us and think that we were a bunch of selfish arseholes, and they’ll probably be right too.
Andrew wrote an essay a couple of years ago about Work/Life balance. The essay explored exploitation within the architectural profession and why it happens. The response was huge, making it one of the most read articles of all time on Archdaily. Stoked.

All of this make Andrew seem like a bit of a wanker, but he’s alright. Most people seem to like him when they meet him.
Andrew Maynard
Andrew Maynard
Teams 1 teams

Andrew is Tasmanian and has a bachelor of Environmental Design and a bachelor of Architecture (with honours), both of which he received at the University of Tasmania. He was invited to undertake a PhD at RMIT university, which he started, however someone at RMIT said something mean to him once so he threw a tantrum and left. Andrew has won loads of awards. While still at uni he won an international design competition that sent him around the world. A short time later he won the Asian Pacific Design Awards for his Design Pod. Again the prize was a trip around the world, plus other cool stuff. His prefab housing model has received awards and his built work have gone on to win loads of local and international accolades. Last year HOUSE House received a high commendation in the house of the year category at the World Architecture Festival (WAF) in Singapore. HUGE! Ilma, Hill House and Moor house have also been shortlisted at WAF in the past. Hill House, Anglesea and HOUSE House have all won at the AIA annual awards. His Zero Waste Table received recognition at the United Nations World Environment Day Awards. Awards, Awards, Awards. But you know what they say, awards are like haemorrhoids, sooner or later every arsehole gets one. Andrew’s work has been exhibited throughout the world, which is nice. His first big exhibition was at the YOUNG Guns exhibition in New York City in 2004. At the moment his Styx Valley Protest Shelter is being exhibited at the Venice Architecture Biennale. Venice! Andrew is regularly asked to lecture, which he loves. A couple of years ago he was a keynote speaker at the Malaysian Institute of Architects conference where he gave a lecture to over 2000 delegates. Next year he’ll be a keynote speaker at the New Zealand Institute of Architects conference. What a show off. Last week he was a speaker at a conference that was all about time. Andrew was asked to speak about the way that old buildings influence, and often confine, the way that we see the city in the present. Other speakers were scientists, academics and philosophers. He wasn’t out of his depth, much. Andrew has an ongoing love affair with all types of media. He is interested in the way that the ubiquitous nature of media influences culture. TV, newspapers, magazines, books, and various types of new media have been very kind to Andrew. There are loads of good interviews with him here. He’s even been asked to host TV series, which is rather rad. He declined an audition to host Grand Designs Australia (which he kinda regrets). He did an audition to host a show called THE RENOVATORS. The show turned out to be a flop, so he dodged a bullet with that one. He’s currently being pursued to host a new show, but thats a bit hush hush, so pretend that I didn’t mention it. Andrew is left of centre and can’t keep his political views to himself. He’s keen to see a fair, equitable and generous world. He thinks that there should be an even distribution of wealth and that white middle class people like him should consider their responsibilities more than their rights. After all, the world has been designed in favour of people like him for too long. Andrew’s hero is Peter Singer, the bioethicist, and he attempts to follows Singer’s lead by giving away a healthy chunk of his income to people that could use it more than him. Andrew also tries not to eat meat, because it’s ruthlessly unsustainable, but dead animals are really tasty so he has a lot of trouble with vegetarianism. He’s rather concerned that subsequent generations are going to look back at us and think that we were a bunch of selfish arseholes, and they’ll probably be right too. Andrew wrote an essay a couple of years ago about Work/Life balance. The essay explored exploitation within the architectural profession and why it happens. The response was huge, making it one of the most read articles of all time on Archdaily. Stoked. All of this make Andrew seem like a bit of a wanker, but he’s alright. Most people seem to like him when they meet him.