Robin Day

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Robin Day 0
Robin Day
Robin Day (1915-2010) was Britain’s most famous 20th-century furniture designer. After training at the local art school, he worked as a draughtsman in a furniture factory, a valuable experience which gave him a permanent rapport with production processes and with the technicians on the shopfloor. Robin Day won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in London, which gave him the freedom to explore the European and American avantgarde and develop his keen interest in architecture.
It was at a college dance in 1940 that he first met Lucienne Conradi, then a promising young student in the textiles department.
They married two years later and this was the beginning of a lifelong partnership.
Although best known as a furniture designer – he is best-known for the injection-moulded polypropylene stacking chair, of which more than 20 million have been manufactured – Robin Day has worked in many fields of design including graphics, exhibition and interior design, the radio and television receiver industries, the carpet and vinyl industries and the design of the interior of the Super VC10 and other passenger aircraft. In 1949 he was co-winner of first prize in a competition at the Museum of Modern Art New York for low cost furniture, and in 1950 he began designing for Hille.
In 1951 he was commissioned to design furniture for the Royal Festival Hall, including auditorium seating which is still in place, and later on he designed furniture for many important building in the UK and abroad, notably for concert halls and theatres, airports, stations and sports stadiums.
He received many awards in his life-long career. Moreover, he was elected Royal Designer for Industry and received the OBE (Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire). He was also appointed Senior Fellow of the Royal College of Art and made Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects.
Robin Day
Robin Day
  • 2015 - 2015 †

Robin Day (1915-2010) was Britain’s most famous 20th-century furniture designer. After training at the local art school, he worked as a draughtsman in a furniture factory, a valuable experience which gave him a permanent rapport with production processes and with the technicians on the shopfloor. Robin Day won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in London, which gave him the freedom to explore the European and American avantgarde and develop his keen interest in architecture. It was at a college dance in 1940 that he first met Lucienne Conradi, then a promising young student in the textiles department. They married two years later and this was the beginning of a lifelong partnership. Although best known as a furniture designer – he is best-known for the injection-moulded polypropylene stacking chair, of which more than 20 million have been manufactured – Robin Day has worked in many fields of design including graphics, exhibition and interior design, the radio and television receiver industries, the carpet and vinyl industries and the design of the interior of the Super VC10 and other passenger aircraft. In 1949 he was co-winner of first prize in a competition at the Museum of Modern Art New York for low cost furniture, and in 1950 he began designing for Hille. In 1951 he was commissioned to design furniture for the Royal Festival Hall, including auditorium seating which is still in place, and later on he designed furniture for many important building in the UK and abroad, notably for concert halls and theatres, airports, stations and sports stadiums. He received many awards in his life-long career. Moreover, he was elected Royal Designer for Industry and received the OBE (Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire). He was also appointed Senior Fellow of the Royal College of Art and made Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects.