Taipei Performing Arts Centre

Winner of the ''Performing Arts Centre'' competition Taipei / Taiwan / 2008

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Il progetto vincitore immagina tre teatri comunicanti, “utilizzabili” individualmente o in combinazione con gli altri. Il teatro principale è dotato di 1.500 posti a sedere, mentre gli altri due ne ospitano rispettivamente 800. I volumi dei due teatri più piccoli si inseriscono all’interno di un cubo centrale, avvolto da una superficie ondulata in vetro, all’interno della quale i tre palchi vengono messi in comunicazione formandone uno più grande. Il “cubo” è collocato su un basamento rialzato, in modo tale preservare l’area tradizionalmente occupata dal vicinissimo mercato locale. Nel complesso la struttura occuperà uno spazio ampia 40,000 metri quadri. “Unire gli ambienti favorisce la possibilità di intraprendere nuove sperimentazioni teatrali”, spiegano i progettisti di OMA. Inoltre, un percorso aperto al pubblico all’interno del “cubo” darà modo ai visitatori di osservare parti del backstage tradizionalmente inaccessibili agli spettatori. La conclusione dei lavori è prevista attorno al 2015, con una spesa complessiva attorno ai 90 milioni di euro. (English Text) Why have the most exciting theatrical events of the past 100 years taken place outside the spaces formally designed for them? Can architecture transcend its own dirty secret, the inevitability of imposing limits on what is possible? In recent years, the world has seen a proliferation of performance centres that, according to a mysterious consensus, consist of more or less an identical combination: a 2,000-seat auditorium, a 1,500-seat theatre, and a black box. Overtly iconic external forms disguise conservative internal workings based on 19th century practice (and symbolism: balconies as evidence of social stratification). Although the essential elements of theatre– stage, proscenium, and auditorium– are more than 3,000 years old, there is no excuse for contemporary stagnation. TPAC takes the opposite approach: experimentation in the internal workings of the theatre, producing (without being conceived as such) the external presence of an icon. TPAC consists of three theatres, each of which can function autonomously. The theatres plug into a central cube, which consolidates the stages, backstages and support spaces into a single and efficient whole. This arrangement allows the stages to be modified or merged for unsuspected scenarios and uses. The design offers the advantages of specificity with the freedoms of the undefined. Performance centres typically have a front and a back side. Through its compactness, TPAC has many different “faces,” defined by the individual auditoria that protrude outward and float above this dense and vibrant part of the city. The auditoria read like mysterious, dark elements against the illuminated, animated cube that is clad in corrugated glass. The cube is lifted from the ground and the street extends into the building, gradually separating into different theatres. The Proscenium Playhouse resembles a suspended planet docking with the cube. The audience circulates between an inner and outer shell to access the auditorium. Inside the auditorium, the intersection of the inner shell and the cube forms a unique proscenium that creates any frame imaginable. The Grand Theatre is a contemporary evolution of the large theatre spaces of the 20th century. Resisting the standard shoebox, its shape is slightly asymmetrical. The stage level, parterre, and balcony are unified into a folded plane. Opposite the Grand Theatre on the same level, the Multiform Theatre is a flexible space to accommodate the most experimental performances. The Super Theatre is a massive, factory-like environment formed by coupling the Grand Theatre and Multiform Theatre. It can accommodate the previously impossible ambitions of productions like B.A. Zimmermann’s opera Die Soldaten (1958), which demands a 100-metre-long stage. Existing conventional works can be re-imagined on a monumental scale, and new, as yet unimagined forms of theatre will flourish in the Super Theatre. The general public—even those without a theatre ticket—are also encouraged to enter TPAC. The Public Loop is trajectory through the theatre infrastructure and spaces of production, typically hidden, but equally impressive and choreographed as the “visible” performance. The Public Loop not only enables the audience to experience theatre production more fully, but also allows the theatre to engage a broader public. Partners-in-charge: Rem Koolhaas, David Gianotten Associate-in-charge: Adam Frampton Design team: Ibrahim Elhayawan with: Yannis Chan, Hin-Yeung Cheung, Jim Dodson, Inge Goudsmit, Alasdair Graham, Vincent Kersten, Chiaju Lin, Vivien Liu, Kai Sun Luk, Kevin Mak, Slobodan Radoman, Roberto Requejo, Saul Smeding, Elaine Tsui, Viviano Villarreal, Casey Wang, Leonie Wenz Competition team: partners / designers: Rem Koolhaas, David Gianotten, Ole Scheeren, and senior architects: André Schmidt, Mariano Sagasta and Adam Frampton, with: Erik Amir, Josh Beck, Jean-Baptiste Bruderer, David Brown, Andrew Bryant, Steven Chen, Dan Cheong, Ryan Choe, Antoine Decourt, Mitesh Dixit, Pingchuan Fu, Alexander Giarlis, Richard Hollington, Shabnam Hosseini, Sean Hoo, Takuya Hosokai, Miguel Huelga, Nicola Knop, Chiaju Lin, Sandra Mayritsch, Vincent McIlduff, Alexander Menke, Ippolito Pestellini, Gabriele Pitacco, Shiyun Qian, Joseph Tang, Agustin Perez-Torres, Xinyuan Wang, Ali Yildirim, Patrizia Zobernig COLLABORATORS Local architect: Artech Architects Theatre consultant: dUCKS scéno, CSI Interior designer: Inside Outside Landscape designer: Inside Outside Acoustic consultant: DHV Structural engineer: Arup Structure, Evergreen MEP engineer: Arup MEP, Heng Kai, IS Lin Fire engineer: Arup Fire, TFSC Lighting consultant: Chroma 33 Facade engineer: ABT, CDC Sustainability consultant: Arup Building Physics, Segreene Geotechnical engineer: Sino Geotech Traffic consultant: EECI Traffic Model: Vincent de Rijk, RJ Models 台北艺术中心 – 文本 为什么过去百年间最令人兴奋的剧场盛事总是发生在正规场所之外?建筑如何才能超越自身卑微龌龊的秘密,摆脱那种限制各种可能的宿命? 近年来,世界各地的演艺中心数目渐增,但不知何故,这些演艺中心似乎达成一种共识,呈现出雷同的空间组合:一座约2000席的大型演艺厅和一个1500席的中型剧院,再加上一个黑盒子剧场。标志性的外形掩饰以典型十九世纪做法为基础的保守内部剧场布局(及其象征:包厢见证着社会阶级观念。) 纵然剧院最基本的构造元素如舞台、镜框式剧场和观众席等,已有三千多年历史,但我们仍不应以此作为借口,让现代剧场建筑的创新发展停滞不前。台北艺术中心正进行着相反的尝试——以实验性手法设计剧院的内部布局,从而自然地创造出一个地标。 台北艺术中心由三个剧场组成,每个剧场都可独立自主地运作。三座剧院嵌入一个中央方形量体,而这些剧院的舞台、后舞台及剧场服务设施均设置于此方形量体,结合成一个高效率的使用量体。此安排使舞台可被调整或合并使用,满足超乎预期的假想和用法。本设计提供了发挥各种自由及不确定性的优点。 剧院建筑通常都有正面及背面,而透过紧凑的设计,台北艺术中心却拥有多个「正面」。界定这些「正面」的是剧场观众席量体,它们由中央方形量体凸出,漂浮于高密度而又充满生气的城市上方。这些观众席量体以黑暗又神秘的姿态,悬浮凸出于方形量体,方形量体被波浪玻璃包覆着,发光而且富有动感。方形量体由地面抬高,让临近街道延伸至建筑物内部,并通往不同剧场。 镜框式中剧场凸出于方形量体,犹如悬浮的星体。剧场内,观众在球体内壳与外壳的空间穿梭前往观众席。内壳与方形量体的交汇,组成了一个独特的活动式镜框,让导演自由构想舞台的可能性。 大剧院是由二十世纪大型剧场空间演化而来的当代版本。不同于传统的鞋盒型剧场,大剧院呈不对称形状。舞台、主观众席和楼座坐席坐落在一延续之折叠地形。大剧院同一层对面是多形式中剧场,其灵活的空间使用乃专门为最具实验性的表演而设。 超级大剧场由多形式中剧场和大剧院组成,提供一个大规模、类似工厂般的环境。超级大剧场成就过去被视为不可能的大制作,例如BA Zimmermann需要100米表演舞台的歌剧Die Soldaten (1958)。现存的传统作品可在更大尺度的想像下重新演绎,而那些创新作品,更透过超级剧场独特的建筑空间,激发出更多活力。 台北艺术中心亦欢迎没有买票进剧场的访客进入。公共参观动线是贯穿一般隐藏的剧场基建及制作空间的动线路径,观众可一窥精彩而编排有序的后台风光,而这些风光媲美台上表演。公共参观动线不但容许观众亲身体验剧场制作,而且让剧场的影响层面遍及普罗大众。
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    Il progetto vincitore immagina tre teatri comunicanti, “utilizzabili” individualmente o in combinazione con gli altri. Il teatro principale è dotato di 1.500 posti a sedere, mentre gli altri due ne ospitano rispettivamente 800. I volumi dei due teatri più piccoli si inseriscono all’interno di un cubo centrale, avvolto da una superficie ondulata in vetro, all’interno della quale i tre palchi vengono messi in comunicazione formandone uno più grande. Il “cubo” è collocato su un basamento...

    Project details
    • Year 2008
    • Work started in 2012
    • Client Department of Cultural Affairs, Taipei City Government
    • Cost 140 million
    • Status Current works
    • Type Multi-purpose Cultural Centres / Theatres
    • Websitewww.oma.com
    Lovers 21 users